The Bausch & Lomb Story

 Johann Jakob Bausch & Henry C. Lomb

Johann Jakob Bausch & Henry C. Lomb

One of the oldest continually operating companies in the US today, Bausch & Lomb traces its roots to 1853, when John Jacob Bausch, a German immigrant, set up a tiny optical goods shop in Rochester, New York. When he needed more money to keep the business going, Bausch borrowed $60 from his good friend, Henry Lomb. Bausch promised that if the business grew, Lomb would be made a full partner. The business did grow and the partnership was formed.
In the early years, Bausch & Lomb manufactured revolutionary rubber eyeglass frames as well as a variety of optical products that required a high degree of manufacturing precision. By 1903, the firm had been issued patents for microscopes, binoculars, and even a camera shutter based on the eye’s reaction to light.

A History of Innovation
In the 1900’s, Bausch & Lomb continued to demonstrate its place at the forefront of technological innovation for optical products. Bausch & Lomb produced the first optical quality glass made in America, developed ground-breaking sunglasses for the military in World War I, and created the lenses used on the cameras that took the first satellite pictures of the moon. In 1971, Bausch & Lomb introduced the first soft contact lenses and is still the largest global provider of eye care products.
   Although products and times have changed, Bausch & Lomb still adheres to the legacy of dedication to innovation, quality, and craftsmanship established by John Jacob Bausch and Henry Lomb.

Birth of the Aviators model
Aviator sunglasses (or "pilot glasses") were originally developed in 1936 by Bausch & Lomb for pilots to protect their eyes while flying, thus the name. 
   In its military usage, the sunglasses replaced the outmoded flight goggles used previously, as they were designed to be lighter, thinner, and “more elegantly designed”.
   Eventually the aviator sunglasses produced by Bausch & Lomb were trademarked as “Ray Bans”.

The legendary General Douglas MacArthur

The first advertisements for Ray-Ban Aviators stated they would provide “real scientific glare protection,” and were sold as sporting equipment. At this time they had not yet taken on their eventual name, as the Second World War had not yet begun. In addition the 1950s, Aviators with coloured frames were popular in the 1970s, being worn by public figures such as Elvis Presley. During the 1950s, Aviator with sunglasses were a part of the cultural style, mimicking a military ethos.

The first advertisements for Ray-Ban Aviators stated they would provide “real scientific glare protection,” and were sold as sporting equipment. At this time they had not yet taken on their eventual name, as the Second World War had not yet begun. In addition the 1950s, Aviators with coloured frames were popular in the 1970s, being worn by public figures such as Elvis Presley. During the 1950s, Aviator with sunglasses were a part of the cultural style, mimicking a military ethos.